Blog Archives

Things aren’t always as they seem (reflections on Joe Gliniewicz, Patrick Kane, and wrongful convictions)

The September funeral for Fox Lake (Illinois) Lt. Joe Gliniewicz was attended by thousands, and his death was cited by some as emblematic of a “war on cops.” Gliniewicz is now being portrayed not as a brave police officer gunned

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Returning to Prison for the Right Reasons

Hannah Overton, a loving mother of five, languished behind bars for seven years due to a wrongful conviction based on the tragic but non-criminal death of her foster son. The televised images late last year of Hannah leaving jail with

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Exoneration Integrity

Recently, the Ohio Innocence Project announced a triple exoneration of their client Ricky Jackson and his codefendants Kwame Ajamu (formerly Ronnie Bridgeman) and Wiley Bridgeman, former death row inmates who spent nearly 40 years in prison for a crime they

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Reflections on a (fictional) exoneration

Last night I went to see “At the Center,” a new play by Andrew Gallant and Tim Touhy that is lovingly based on the work of the Center on Wrongful Convictions. As an aside, it was a bit surreal to

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Exonerees and mean friends

One of my favorite radio shows, “This American Life,” re-broadcast an episode called “The Allure of the Mean Friend.” It included the story of a man whose father sent him a bill for $2 million, which purportedly represented the cost

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